The Comet roller coaster at Forest Park Highlands The Comet roller coaster at Forest Park Highlands
...And she strikes a pose. This wreckless young lady throws caution to the wind as well as taking a chance of being thrown from the car and being killed by standing up. By the looks on the girls face, her endorphins are at full tilt. She looks like a fun person to know. Who knows, maybe she still is. (both color photos courtesy of the Western Historical Manuscript Collection, University of Missouri-St.Louis) A spectacular view of the Comet train plummeting down the first drop. (courtesy of the Western Historical Manuscript Collection, University of Missouri-St. Louis)
The Comet roller coaster at Forest Park Highlands
The photo above is post fire. Most of the park had already been dismantled at this point. The Comet was the last thing to go. Notice the rubber strips over the top of the tracks. That was to keep vandels from trying to ride the Comet... one ...last... time.
This is one of the first photographs of the Comet I had seen as an adult. It was impressive when I was eight and it was still impressive when I saw it again for the first time as a 38 yr.old. This is looking west and if you look closely on the right side of the photo, just above the two cars on Oakland Ave., behind the trees, you can just make out the Flying Turns /Bobsleds. (courtesy of Western Historical Manuscript Collection, University of Missouri-St. Louis)
Take a front seat ride on the Comet here
This striking photo shows the entire layout of the Comet. The entrance to the coasters' tunnel, the curving breakrun, and the several curves and dips are what kept many people of St. Louis screaming for joy as they streaked along Oakland Ave. for over 20 years. Also notice the train tracks of the parks' earlier miniature railway, the Century Flyer, on the oppisite side of the Comet field that Little Toot would later occupy. This coaster was clearly one of Herbert Schmecks' masterpieces.
Remember your first time? I remember all of mine. This was the Comets' first time open to the public, May 15, 1941. Look at the joy on their faces, especially the one in the second car, second seat. She looks like she's in pure rapture. They all do, don't they? (Courtesy of Western Historical Manuscrit Collection, University of Missouri-St. Louis) Notice the Comets' tunnel in the background. Most coasters didn't have tunnels, but the Comet had a dandy. It had drops and unexpected turns ensuring many surprises for first time riders. Check out the people in the first and second car. The one girl with the closed mouth reminds me of Mayim Bialik, or Bette Midler. Check out Eddie Munster over her right shoulder! (Courtesy of Western Historical Manuscript Collection, University of Missouri-St. Louis.)
Photo added 8-23-12 : This photo was sent to me by Faye Venegoni, found while she was looking through her old family photos. I love when that happens! I really enjoy this photo! Imagine a nice wood coaster like this looming in YOUR backyard! Thanks, Faye!
This is one of my very, very favorite photographs in my collection. I can just imagine the two little boys, their eyes wide with the wonder and majesty that is the Comet. They are probably brothers and the older one is telling his youngest sibling that the ride is no big deal when the kid was probably scared to death riding it. This picture was the very first of the Comet that I saw as an adult. I was so glad my first coaster wasn't some dinky little thing that my mind had built up over time. You know how it is, sometimes your memory enlarges things, sometimes your memory shrinks them. courtesy of Missouri Historical Society, St. Louis
Photo added 6-16-13 : A tasty little picture I found while lurking on ebay...
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